FRAMING APPRECIATION

FRAMING APPRECIATION

FRAMING1

SIMPLE LAYOUT: CENTER OF ATTENTION

Be it the head of the family, or the birthday star. Placing them center in the screen will do the job.

BIRD’S EYE VIEW

 Have a big group of people? Or even two? Placing the camera high up will make interesting persepectives.

WORM’S EYE VIEW

You can feel like you are part of hearing a secret as seen in frame 1. Subjects can also be made to look more imposing.
Or simply just directing the viewer to the spot where the subjects are looking at.

FRAMING1_DOORS_B

SIMPLE LAYOUT: FRAMING WITH DOORS/WINDOWS

Using frames helps to subtly give focus to your characters, as well as make the shot more interesting.
The first frame has 3 doors as Deok sun narrates about her love beginning. Is it also a hint of her future 3 ‘romances’?

FRAMING1_DOOR

RULE OF THIRDS and PHI GRID

Notice how the first two scenes use the rule of thirds, to frame the subjects, or using the intersecting lines to guide them.
The intersecting lines of the Phi Grid helps to guide the eyes of the viewer in the third scene.
Combining these with door frames, or even FG and BG objects, you can further emphasize your subjects.

FRAMING_FG

SIMPLE LAYOUT: FRAMING WITH FOREGROUND OBJECTS

Using the fence and the trees, as well as the policemen closing in on the student and Sung appa…a boxed in feeling is created.
The boxes of tupperware frames the Kim family as Ra Miran talks them through what they can eat.
Sunwoo and Bora frames the two unsuspecting people in the distance that they intend to leave behind.

FRAMING WITH WINDOWS

Deok sun and her mum watches Bora leave in disbelief. The windows frame their confused looks.

SHOOTING IN MIRRORS

Subjects can be made more interesting by shooting over their shoulders, and seeing their expressions in the mirror.
A framed mirror can have the same effect as using doors and windows.

FRAMING WITH SPACE

You don’t always need objects to frame your subjects.
Sometimes space works even better to focus on what you want to emphasize on.

PLAYING WITH DIAGONALS

Height differences makes for an interesting scene. It conveys motion or action, or suggest a power dynamic.

GROUPING WITH V

Okay I don’t know the correct naming of this.
But see it being used in Ep10, by letting Dong Ryong sit on a higher ground, he now stands out from the rest.

FRAMING_DoF

DEPTH OF FIELD

Playing with the camera depth of field can put the emphasis on the character in focus.
It can also be used to create a feeling of distance between characters,
even if they are in a small space together,like the lift scene in Ep9.

USING ELEMENTS

Using the thick foreground pillar, viewers can visually see the divide between Sunyoung and her mum-in-law.
A well placed streetlight is used to make Bora stand out of the dark background.
Even simple vertical lines from wall scrolls can be used to frame the Baduk center manager.

GOLDEN RATIO

Often a shape called the Fibonacci spiral is overlaid on the image. Since the golden ratio is 1.618 which doesn’t match any aspect ratio, we let the top and bottom fall off the screen. Now by placing our subject on those lines, we create a traditionally pleasing shot.
Please visit the link for more information.

SINGLE POINT PERSPECTIVE

In Ep1, Deok sun seems to cut a small lonely figure, as she walks down the now seemingly extra-deep alley after she returns from the Olympics opening on the night of her birthday.

FORESHADOWING

Other than the basic rules of grouping, mirroring body postures, are a way to add subtlety to the scene
and give hints of the story to come.
Here we see Deok Sun unconsciously mirroring Taek as she sits opposite him.
The future in-laws are grouped together and framed on a different level.

PLACEMENT OF CHARACTERS

FRAMING_Middle1

Where every character is placed in a scene should not be random.
We can see that Taek has been subtly placed in between Deok Sun and Jung Hwan throughout the episodes.

FRAMING_Middle2

SIMPLE LAYOUT:
CENTER OF ATTENTION

Be it the head of the family, or the birthday star. Placing them center in the screen will do the job.

BIRD’S EYE VIEW

 Have a big group of people? Or even two? Placing the camera high up will make interesting persepectives.

WORM’S EYE VIEW

You can feel like you are part of hearing a secret as seen in frame 1. Subjects can also be made to look more imposing.
Or simply just directing the viewer to the spot where the subjects are looking at.

SIMPLE LAYOUT:
FRAMING WITH DOORS/WINDOWS

Using frames helps to subtly give focus to your characters, as well as make the shot more interesting.
The first frame has 3 doors as Deok sun narrates about her love beginning. Is it also a hint of her future 3 ‘romances’?

RULE OF THIRDS and PHI GRID

Notice how the first two scenes use the rule of thirds, to frame the subjects, or using the intersecting lines to guide them.
The intersecting lines of the Phi Grid helps to guide the eyes of the viewer in the third scene.
Combining these with door frames, or even FG and BG objects, you can further emphasize your subjects.

SIMPLE LAYOUT:
FRAMING WITH FOREGROUND OBJECTS

Using the fence and the trees, as well as the policemen closing in on the student and Sung appa…a boxed in feeling is created.
The boxes of tupperware frames the Kim family as Ra Miran talks them through what they can eat.
Sunwoo and Bora frames the two unsuspecting people in the distance that they intend to leave behind.

FRAMING WITH WINDOWS

Deok sun and her mum watches Bora leave in disbelief. The windows frame their confused looks.

SHOOTING IN MIRRORS

Subjects can be made more interesting by shooting over their shoulders, and seeing their expressions in the mirror.
A framed mirror can have the same effect as using doors and windows.

FRAMING WITH SPACE

You don’t always need objects to frame your subjects.
Sometimes space works even better to focus on what you want to emphasize on.

PLAYING WITH DIAGONALS

Height differences makes for an interesting scene. It conveys motion or action, or suggest a power dynamic.

GROUPING WITH V

Okay I don’t know the correct naming of this.
But see it being used in Ep10, by letting Dong Ryong sit on a higher ground, he now stands out from the rest.

DEPTH OF FIELD

Playing with the camera depth of field can put the emphasis on the character in focus.
It can also be used to create a feeling of distance between characters,
even if they are in a small space together,like the lift scene in Ep9.

USING ELEMENTS

Using the thick foreground pillar, viewers can visually see the divide between Sunyoung and her mum-in-law.
A well placed streetlight is used to make Bora stand out of the dark background.
Even simple vertical lines from wall scrolls can be used to frame the Baduk center manager.

GOLDEN RATIO

Often a shape called the Fibonacci spiral is overlaid on the image. Since the golden ratio is 1.618 which doesn’t match any aspect ratio, we let the top and bottom fall off the screen. Now by placing our subject on those lines, we create a traditionally pleasing shot.
Please visit the link for more information.

SINGLE POINT PERSPECTIVE

In Ep1, Deok sun seems to cut a small lonely figure, as she walks down the now seemingly extra-deep alley after she returns from the Olympics opening on the night of her birthday.

FORESHADOWING

Other than the basic rules of grouping, mirroring body postures, are a way to add subtlety to the scene
and give hints of the story to come.
Here we see Deok Sun unconsciously mirroring Taek as she sits opposite him.
The future in-laws are grouped together and framed on a different level.

PLACEMENT OF CHARACTERS

Where every character is placed in a scene should not be random.
We can see that Taek has been subtly placed in between Deok Sun and Jung Hwan throughout the episodes.

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